Thinking of taking up a martial art

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BlackRonin
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Post by BlackRonin » Wed Aug 17, 2005 1:30 pm

ahh i see, what amases me is where he found all the time

personally i struggle from day to day with anythin other than sleep, work and sh*t

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sprout
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Post by sprout » Wed Aug 17, 2005 3:32 pm

every other day is training for me, excluding private training i do myself. not that hard to fit it in, just have no social life. 8)

BlackRonin
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Post by BlackRonin » Wed Aug 17, 2005 6:28 pm

wats a social life :D

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Banzai Joe
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Post by Banzai Joe » Wed Aug 17, 2005 9:47 pm

wtf? wrote:dont be afraid to chalenge a instructor on something you dissagree with. if he knows his art... if he's worth learning from... he will welcome the questions, and have a good... common sense answer for you. and will also be able to dissprove any missgivings you have.

im constantly probing my instructors with
'but that doesnt make sense, cus of this....'
or
'yeah... but what if this happened?'
and
'ah, but id be able to do THIS'

and other such annoyances..... its the only way you learn.
Only half agree with you there Wraith, Angleus you have to have enough common sense NOT to be rude when addressing certain questions of effectiveness. Most techniques are done in the dojo at a speed and severity that will NOT hurt your opponent. Sometimes the only way to show a techniques true effectiveness is to apply it in its most brutal fashion, and this can often leaves a carcass on the floor.
As a beginner, be inquisitive, but also have faith in your instructor and sometimes following his/her lead without question can lead you to finding the technique for yourself and thus making it yours.
This comes from 12 years of aikido.......
I also taught kick/thai boxing, which imho is the best combat art to improve fitness, touchness and reactions. But it aint for the weak-hearted or weak-minded.
Good luck dude.

Angelus

Post by Angelus » Thu Aug 18, 2005 11:37 am

Thanks Joe, yeah I wouldn't try being rude to a martial arts instructor I've tried a few arts before and have a slight regard for my health and safety so not something I'd be doing in a hurry lol. Still trying to talk my brother into coming with me at the moment before contacting the instructor myself

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Satori
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Post by Satori » Thu Aug 18, 2005 12:39 pm

BlackRonin wrote:ahh i see, what amases me is where he found all the time

personally i struggle from day to day with anythin other than sleep, work and sh*t
It was his work, and he did it in his spare time, so that's why he managed to fit it in.

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wtf?
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Post by wtf? » Thu Aug 18, 2005 8:54 pm

Joes Post
i didnt mean just be rude, and obnoxious.

i meant that you shouldnt take everything at face value. a good instructor will be able to answer questions you have, with decent answers. and you SHOULD ask questions about the art your about to take up.

a bad instructor will give you suger covered sh*t.

i always used to ask a lot of the sport arts (karate, thai boxing, kick boxing) how their art was combat effective, if it missed out groundwork, and pressure points... things that would really help.

from most, i got...
'were too good to get thrown'
or
'you just train to be faster, than the other guy'
and my personal favourate....
'rolling around on the floor is for gay blokes, mate.... plus you dont wanna get your clothes dirty... you gotta look good, while your kicking someone in the face'

that last one had me really concerned about the state of mankind.

so yeah... just ask questions. ask about techniques, the histpry, the dojo, and what they specificly teach.... ask about the sensei, and anything he's particularly proud of, that the dojo has done, or whatever else.

i personally, enjoy nothing more, than answering questions from the new students... i remember doing demo's in a university bar, because everyone thought you couldnt generate a decent punch, in just 1 inch. lol

BlackRonin
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Post by BlackRonin » Thu Aug 18, 2005 11:49 pm

i remember from a few year back, took up tae kwon do for a few weeks untill job hrs changed

it was all practice stance, punch, kick but when sparring take up a more boxer like bouncing type formation with arms raised at head level, then when they decided to show real world applications it was all get the guy on the ground and knock him out

made me wander at time why practice stance if u to take up boxer type look in spar, only used tkd stances for 1 and 3 step spar

and if real world means throw guy to ground and knock out why didnt we practice throws :S

but it was fun while it lasted

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michael_collins_2000_ie
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Post by michael_collins_2000_ie » Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:08 am

Mauy Thai is a form of thai kickboxing, punches kicks elbows knees, that kinda thing. And theres always Krabi Kabong, a 2 sword thai art, if you want something thats fun and pushes you, cos its a LOT more traditional thatn MT, it draws a lot more on the roots of muay thai. And its a battlefield art, a killing art, deadly and wicked.

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wtf?
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Post by wtf? » Fri Aug 19, 2005 9:33 pm

BlackRonin wrote:i remember from a few year back, took up tae kwon do for a few weeks untill job hrs changed

it was all practice stance, punch, kick but when sparring take up a more boxer like bouncing type formation with arms raised at head level, then when they decided to show real world applications it was all get the guy on the ground and knock him out

made me wander at time why practice stance if u to take up boxer type look in spar, only used tkd stances for 1 and 3 step spar

and if real world means throw guy to ground and knock out why didnt we practice throws :S

but it was fun while it lasted
yeah, it happens a lot in most arts... they dont include the things that matter... only those that look good at speed, or are fun for tournaments.

as a general rule, TQD, karate, judo, thai boxing, any art that teaches sport fighting as their main goal, aikido, and a whole host of others arnt decent combat arts.

its REALLY hard to find a single art that teaches all you might need.... more than likely, you'd need to take different parts, from different arts.

but like i said before, there are some good arts about, as long as you learn their limits... then use other arts to fix the holes.

The Green Man
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Post by The Green Man » Tue Aug 23, 2005 1:19 pm

This thread has inspired me to see what's available near where I live. The local sports centre offers Tae Kwon Do, Aikido, Karate, Thai Boxing and Sequence Dance :D . Bearing in mind that I'm not in the first flush of youth and have the fitness level of a chicken mcnugget what would be my best starting point? All advice (even the cruel, heartless stuff) greatly welcomed.

Angelus

Post by Angelus » Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:08 pm

I won't recommend one because I don't have that much experience but I can tell you about when I did Karate and Tae Kwon Do. Both can be pretty intensive in terms of workouts, I remember feeling knackered after the warm ups for tae kwon do, but in terms of street level combat they are not the best from what I've been told by those in the know. Tae Kwon Do focuses mostly on kicks and so flexibility is useful there (although it will come with time). Much of the lessons if I remember rightly were basically doing various moves up and down the hall with a bit of light sparing at the end. I personally wouldn't want to take either of them up again to be honest but there are plenty of people who get on really well with both arts, my advice would be to go and observe the classes that interest you and base your choice on those observations

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wtf?
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Post by wtf? » Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:14 pm

from that list, aikido... its a good starter art, and its not really very physical (when compared to karate, kick boxing, TQD, etc)

it teaches a LOT of usefull ideas.

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Banzai Joe
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Post by Banzai Joe » Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:28 pm

wtf? wrote:from that list, aikido... its a good starter art, and its not really very physical (when compared to karate, kick boxing, TQD, etc)

it teaches a LOT of usefull ideas.

lol, ok dude, enough now! Im 'aving yer for that one, cos we've been getting on too well today ;)

Aikido can and is very often far more physical than the other arts u just mentioned.
Firstly aikido is practiced with partners 99% of the time, whereas the others only incoorporate partners during sparring or one-step type stuff.
Having 12 years of aikido experience, i say this from experience. I trained kickboxing for 3-4 years 5 nights a weeks, and ended up teaching for the last year, its physically demanding as far as fitness goes (i think its the best for that). Aikido doesn't necessarily require a deal of fitness of flexibility to start with, but it sure will take it out of your body real quick and let you know what pain is.
Having said that, you are right, its a good art to start......but at any level.

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wtf?
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Post by wtf? » Tue Aug 23, 2005 5:50 pm

my point was, you wont be made to do striking drills, press-ups, squats, etc... apart from warm up.

theres a lot more direct work, but it will be slow, and deliberate... not the padwork, and sparing of something like kickboxing.

its not gonna be a straight out slog. and the techniques arnt that dynamic first off, where kickboxing will be repitive kicking, punching, drills.

ive not done that much aikido in my time... about 2 years... but id happily say that its a softer art, and less phsicly demanding than karate/kick boxing, straight off the bat.

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