Mixing your arts.....complements or contradicts?!

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Steve Ishikawa
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Post by Steve Ishikawa » Thu Oct 28, 2004 12:32 pm

hahahahahhahahaha

i have the script of pulp fiction if you want it lol.

http://www.godamongdirectors.com - follow the links for Quentin Tarantino and you'll get the scripts of all his great films. Oh yeah - Pulp Fiction rules!

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kiri
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Post by kiri » Thu Oct 28, 2004 2:20 pm

Steve Ishikawa wrote:Kiri.

Great post mate. But i don't agree with new martial arts having no history and being sh*t. .

Hi, I did not mean to say that all "new" martial arts are bad. I agree everything had to start somewhere.

Having said that there is no need to re-invent the wheel, after all why disregard several hundred years or more practical experience and start from scratch. This is particularly relevent to internal systems where the Nei Gung etc. probably took hundreds (if not thousands) of years of cumulative knowledge to discover.

As I said I rate JKD quite highly. For something quick and practical I think Krav Maga is quite good too. Jutedo is very interesting. All these are quite new arts (although obviously all these systems are highly influenced by what has gone before) however they were developed by very experienced masters who were allready hugely proficient in their foundation styles.

I generally think the unarmed combat taught to the military (with the exception of Systema) is not anything to write home about. (Thank god they have guns!)

Sometimes you have to admire peoples ingenuity and spirit in developing their own stuff. I remember back in the 80's there was a "martial art" (Hojutsu) that combined the body dynamics of ninjutsu with the techniques of practical shotgun. There where all these guys dressed in black crawling round the countryside trying to run up walls while they were carrying a SPAS 17 ! very amusing.

What I was really refering too was the idiots you get advertising in the back of "Combat" "Fighter" "Black Belt" etc...

"Master Joe Blogs devestating steel monkey death touch, transmited to him exclusively by aliens, allows the average member of the public to walk through walls and defeat any attacker with only five minutes of training a day....... etc etc."

Also those guys who have reached shodan in Karate in maybe 3 years and then go on to found their own sysytem when they are really not that advanced..

Happy days.

K

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Banzai Joe
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Post by Banzai Joe » Thu Oct 28, 2004 2:34 pm

kiri wrote:What I was really refering too was the idiots you get advertising in the back of "Combat" "Fighter" "Black Belt" etc...

"Master Joe Blogs devestating steel monkey death touch, transmited to him exclusively by aliens, allows the average member of the public to walk through walls and defeat any attacker with only five minutes of training a day....... etc etc."

Also those guys who have reached shodan in Karate in maybe 3 years and then go on to found their own sysytem when they are really not that advanced..

Happy days.

K
nice one Kiri, agree 100%. Too many 'black belts' attempt to do this. Sad thing is they often do well (financially) cos they have a class full of noobs who know no better).
It is the links with tradition and the past that maintain the spirit and essence of a martial art.

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Bugsy
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Post by Bugsy » Fri Oct 29, 2004 1:38 am

darkhobo wrote:agreed, in my dojo there is a different grading system for age groups, so just because some 8 year old is a black belt, doesnt mean me (white belt one tip) wouldnt be able to knock him out in one punch
That's a really good point. I do karate, and at the first nationals I went to, I was only a wee yellow belt. Because of my age/height I was put in with everything under a brown belt at my height, even though I'd only just started. Somehow I pulled off the gold, proving that belts mean jack sh*t!
Also, whoever mentioned ballet - that's a really good idea. It seems to use the same muscle groups as many of the martial arts. I'm so taking it up again!

EDIT: Lol, I didn't see that there's actually a shitload of other pages after the quote I used - soz folks!

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Post by Guest » Wed Jan 05, 2005 1:12 pm

If you check Talhoffer's Manuscript for Medieval Combat you will find out that certain things there were explicitily influenced by foreign fighting arts, and much of it applies to other martial arts who were influenced by other arts, or adapted to the needs in the battlefield.

I'm a firm believer of versatility, if you come to think of it, picture a Specs Op unit, all its members are oft trained to grab anything and everything they come by, and use it proficiently, same has been in all battlefield and all times.

Then picture yourself able to respond to a certain kind of technique, when something doesn't fit with it, then you are buggered, or if you can only use two handed swords, when you get cut in one arm then you are buggered.

I vote for versatility, which is why I devote myself to studying and practicing a combination of martial arts I believe complement the others (even tho I still and always will need to complement them more and more)

spoonburger
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Post by spoonburger » Fri Jan 07, 2005 8:18 pm

Began with using a chinese broadsword in a Wu-shu style, until I could be taught no more at all, and only then did I begin to use a japanese weapon. I suppose the chinese swordplay messed things up, because it's so elegant and circular, so when I began to wield that heavy bokken I didn't really know what was going on, but once you get the hang of two seperate arts I feel they do begin to compliment each other... If I am sparring, i can just adapt myself depending on my opponent, using the elegant moves o the chinese sword with a bokken. Odd it may seem but it just works.

Then I grab some hookswords, or some sai. And have no idea what the f*ck is going on, they are too unique to compliment or conflict with one another.

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Post by Guest » Sat Jan 08, 2005 8:42 pm

spoonburger wrote:Began with using a chinese broadsword in a Wu-shu style, until I could be taught no more at all, and only then did I begin to use a japanese weapon. I suppose the chinese swordplay messed things up, because it's so elegant and circular, so when I began to wield that heavy bokken I didn't really know what was going on, but once you get the hang of two seperate arts I feel they do begin to compliment each other... If I am sparring, i can just adapt myself depending on my opponent, using the elegant moves o the chinese sword with a bokken. Odd it may seem but it just works.

Then I grab some hookswords, or some sai. And have no idea what the f*ck is going on, they are too unique to compliment or conflict with one another.
That's a most interesting post.
So you have mastered the Chinese broadsword or just what the person who taught you knew?

And certainly I can tel you have not much clue what the bokken is for, certainly it;s not for fancy stuff, and yes you are entitled to use it in any way you fancy, but even an educated hand knows how to handle any weapon if it's truly educated, that's when your understanding of the techniques connect with your intentions, otherwise there's one missing, and it's usually the technique.

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darkhobo
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Post by darkhobo » Sat Jan 08, 2005 9:00 pm

well if im not mistaken, all martial arts teach a few basic principles
balance - keep your balance, try to off-balance your opponent
center - protect your center

cant think of any more right now, but if all martial arts teach the same basic things, how could simply knowing more of another form ever hurt you?

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