Hanwei Saxon Scramasax with 7" Bone Handles

Share your knowledge of sword history, sword use and forging processes here

Moderators: Big Lazy, Moderators

Post Reply
User avatar
Big Lazy
Blades-UK Admin
Posts: 9986
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2003 1:00 pm
Location: The Best Midlands
Contact:

Hanwei Saxon Scramasax with 7" Bone Handles

Post by Big Lazy » Fri Apr 28, 2006 9:38 am

Now these are something special and would really look the part displayed next to my viking sword :wink:

Image

Image

Image

Image

here's the info

The Scramasax was a utility knife and tool utilized by several Germanic tribes, specifically the Saxons and the Lombard warriors, between the 4th and 10th centuries CE. It was carried horizontally on the back of the belt for concealment and easy access. If primary weapons were lost, the scramasax made an ideal last-resort combat weapon.

The single-edged blades are constructed out of high-carbon steel and detailed with an authentic etched “niello” design. An extremely durable leather sheath with intricate knot work and includes a belt frog.


There's also a Stag horn handle available but I much prefer the bone handle. Me thinks I may just have to get the old crdit card out again for this one (H)

User avatar
Blackbird
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2003 1:27 pm
Location: Dundonia
Contact:

Post by Blackbird » Fri Apr 28, 2006 12:14 pm

Nice not to keen on broken back seaxes but love everything else about it.

User avatar
sprout
Posts: 1910
Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 10:37 pm

Post by sprout » Fri Apr 28, 2006 4:56 pm

nice blade, like the look of that. although i hate bone/stag thats not bad.

User avatar
wabhimself
Posts: 1170
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2004 5:38 pm
Location: somewhere, nowhere, everywhere!

Post by wabhimself » Fri Apr 28, 2006 10:20 pm

urgh, l dont like the blade of it, it seems to cut off too abrubtly for my liking, l like something with a bit of a flow to it

HatchA

Post by HatchA » Fri Apr 28, 2006 10:44 pm

Dude... it says the "overall length" is 7 inches, not the bone handle...

nice enough though.

User avatar
Moon
Posts: 2863
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2005 2:57 pm
Location: In orbit

Post by Moon » Fri Apr 28, 2006 11:25 pm

Not my field but it appears to be a tad short and out of proportion compared to the 'Thames Scramasax' blade circa 9th Century.

http://www.homestead.com/englishheathen ... masax.html

darksun_uk is your man here,IMO.

User avatar
Big Lazy
Blades-UK Admin
Posts: 9986
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2003 1:00 pm
Location: The Best Midlands
Contact:

Post by Big Lazy » Sat Apr 29, 2006 8:54 am

HatchA wrote:Dude... it says the "overall length" is 7 inches, not the bone handle...

nice enough though.
Does it :| damn my own tool is bigger then that

User avatar
wtf?
Posts: 1586
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 12:31 am

Post by wtf? » Sat Apr 29, 2006 9:13 am

Larny Boy wrote:
HatchA wrote:Dude... it says the "overall length" is 7 inches, not the bone handle...

nice enough though.
Does it :| damn my own tool is bigger then that
if it has a weight tied to the end, and you squint when taking measurements. 8)

(couldnt resist)

User avatar
darksun_uk
Mod
Posts: 2034
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2003 9:07 pm
Location: sunny manchester
Contact:

Post by darksun_uk » Sat Apr 29, 2006 11:49 am

overall blade style for the period 10th century is fine however for me it just looks wrong (to small i think) and the etching is poorly done (imho) the sheath also looks to modern.

kind regards

User avatar
wtf?
Posts: 1586
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 12:31 am

Post by wtf? » Sat Apr 29, 2006 12:00 pm

see, i like the sheath, i wouldnt mind something very similar for a khukri (that sheath from the outside looks like its already shaped for a small one, as it is)

i know nothing about seax, but like DS said, it does look very small, and to me... miss-proportioned. plus i dont like horn or bone like materials as a handle.

User avatar
darksun_uk
Mod
Posts: 2034
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2003 9:07 pm
Location: sunny manchester
Contact:

Post by darksun_uk » Sat Apr 29, 2006 2:55 pm

Image

a more traditional (imho) size sax, with traditional style sheath worn correctly (edge up) by a re-enactor bloke 8)

Post Reply