Which one?

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Which would you choose?

1050 'through' tempered blade CS
8
28%
1095 'diff' tempered blade PC
21
72%
 
Total votes: 29

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kenshin the endymion
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Post by kenshin the endymion » Thu Apr 15, 2004 2:53 pm

thanks mate, much apprecaited

Raindog951
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Post by Raindog951 » Wed Apr 21, 2004 8:00 pm

I haven't forgotten...still trying to get hold of scales!

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kenshin the endymion
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Post by kenshin the endymion » Wed Apr 21, 2004 8:06 pm

hey don't worry about it time flows and we mortals are caught in its ebb

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tydus
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Post by tydus » Tue Apr 27, 2004 6:14 am

Hmm. I disagree with those who say the PPK is weaker than the CS. Although I am relatively new at swords I have been studying. I have been told by multiple sources that the blood groove, or bo-hi as I recall, actually weakens the integrity of a blade. Think of it this way. Some one mentioned earlier that the Generation 2 PPK was 2mm thinner, making it weaker. A blood groove basically makes that part of the blade thinner as well and reduces the steels overall mass. That makes that area weaker and easier to break. If that area was to crack from stress the entire sword would eventually crumble. Also, diamonds are made of carbon and as many know, diamond is the hardest of all material on earth. 1095 is much stronger and solid than 1050 but is more brittle which makes it easier to chip. However it will hold its edge much better. Maybe I am misunderstood in what I say. As I said I am generally new at this and do not in anyway mean to contradict or insult some one who has been in the field for many years. My views are strictly for the accurate critiqueing of these fine blades and if I am wrong please tell me so I can learn from it.

Sincerely,
Matt McKellar

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Lord David the Denied
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Post by Lord David the Denied » Tue Apr 27, 2004 12:02 pm

For anyone that doubts the strength of the PPK, I have a video of a PPK being used to cut a 2" dowel rod. Goes through it like it's not there.

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kenshin the endymion
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Post by kenshin the endymion » Tue Apr 27, 2004 6:52 pm

i have a pk and that cuts fine-very strong indeed don't forget that carbon steel is strong strong stuff!

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darksun_uk
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Post by darksun_uk » Tue Apr 27, 2004 7:37 pm

tydus wrote:Hmm. I disagree with those who say the PPK is weaker than the CS. Although I am relatively new at swords I have been studying. I have been told by multiple sources that the blood groove, or bo-hi as I recall, actually weakens the integrity of a blade. Think of it this way. Some one mentioned earlier that the Generation 2 PPK was 2mm thinner, making it weaker. A blood groove basically makes that part of the blade thinner as well and reduces the steels overall mass. That makes that area weaker and easier to break. If that area was to crack from stress the entire sword would eventually crumble. Also, diamonds are made of carbon and as many know, diamond is the hardest of all material on earth. 1095 is much stronger and solid than 1050 but is more brittle which makes it easier to chip. However it will hold its edge much better. Maybe I am misunderstood in what I say. As I said I am generally new at this and do not in anyway mean to contradict or insult some one who has been in the field for many years. My views are strictly for the accurate critiqueing of these fine blades and if I am wrong please tell me so I can learn from it.

Sincerely,
Matt McKellar
look at this thread for everthing you could want to know about fullers etc http://forum.blades-uk.com/viewtopic.ph ... c&start=30

as far as comparing steels are concerned im sorry to say that you have left out a critical factor in the disscusion about ppk vrs cs kats and that is that one is differntially tempered which adds up to about the same level of overall performance when you consider that the harder edge of the ppk will hold its edge better than the cs blade but any weak technique would chip the ppk's edge however the addtion of a fuller on the cs blade would have the same effect as a fuller is more unforgiving of incorrect blade alignment (due to the extra blade geometry effects)and thus can "take a set" due to this in other words if you pooch your cut your blade will bend as oppose to chipping the edge on your ppk.

diamonds in a post about steel is not relavent 8) diamond is hard but the atomic structure is differnt to steel and thus no meaningful comparison can be drawn.

the very small differerence in carbon content is negilable compare to the heat treatments annealing and edge/ blade geometry issues involved:-

this is a very complex issue and this post only skims over it i suggest more research on metallurgy in general and swords specifically you will be suprised how in depth this can get

kind regards

darksun_uk

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olimorgan
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Post by olimorgan » Tue Apr 27, 2004 7:56 pm

Diff tempered coz then you get a harder edge which will cut and hold an edge better but the slightly softer rear means it absorbs the shock of the cut and so your less likely to snap the blade. Get a diff tempered and you get a beautiful hammon too mmmmmm :lick:

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tydus
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Post by tydus » Wed Apr 28, 2004 1:34 am

I see, thanks darksun. I read that link on fullers and indeed I have learned a few things. Also, I know that steel and diamond are different (way different). I was just trying to make a point about higher carbon amounts versus a lower carbon amount. However, I did not know that the carbon composition was different. I will continue to look in to metallurgy. Also if you have any other links to ideas and sciences of metallurgy that would be great as I have a lot to learn. Thanks again . But anyways I do not want to go off topic so my vote goes to the PPK reguardless.

Sincerely,
Matt McKellar

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